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Results
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Results

The 77 studies retained in the meta-analysis yielded 187 correlations between the TAS and hypnotic susceptibility, with a mean of 2.25 correlations per study (SD = 2.39), as shown in Table 3. The mean sample weighted correlation between the TAS and hypnotizability was .25 (S = 1.51). Table 2 shows the mean number of correlations per study broken down by type of hypnosis scale and by objective and subjective response estimates.

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Most of the studies in the current literature base used the CURSS; HGSHSA; HIP or SHSS: C scales. However, there were several hypnotizability scales used in only one or two studies. There were not enough of these scales to form a separate category. Accordingly the data from these studies were pooled to form a single category labeled "Other." Also included in this category were those studies that developed scales for specialized purposes, or greatly modified existing hypnotizability measures, (see Table 1).

Table 3 shows the publication differences across all scales and by objective and subjective response estimates. There were no significant differences between studies published in books or journals, dissertations or unpublished research.

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The citation year was negatively related to the size of the TAS hypnotizability relationship, r = - .29, p < .001.

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Table 4 shows the differences in the size of the correlations because of individual or group testing formats. Whether the study used a group or an individual hypnosis scale had no significant effect on the size of the relationship between the TAS and hypnotizability, t (145) = 1.54, ns, for the objective or subjective response formats, t (39) = 1.75, ns.

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Home Abstract Introduction Method Results Discussion References Appendix